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Trash

NEWS
By Kim Hynes and KWCH 12 Eyewitness News | November 23, 2010
The Wichita City Council wants public input before making any formal decisions on trash. Tuesday the city manager presented his plan for a trash cooperative during a workshop. The plan calls for every citizen to pay $20 a month for weekly trash collection, bi-weekly recycling and once a year bulky waste pick up. City Manager Bob Layton says 80% of residents will either save money or spend the same amount they are now. The 22 trash hauler's in Wichita support the cooperative.
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NEWS
By Rebecca Gannon and KWCH 12 Eyewitness News | November 23, 2010
"There are towns, like, Newton and Salina, and Derby, that offer this. And here the biggest city in the state, and we don't," said Melissa Alley, who supports trash franchising.  She is the president of the Riverside Neighborhood Association. "I would prefer not to pay more money, and I think most people would say that," said Gary Thompson. "But if its legislated, we may not have a choice," continued the vice president of the Comotara-Mainsgate Neighborhood Association.  He says he's neutral on the issue.
NEWS
By Michael Schwanke and KWCH 12 Eyewitness News | October 25, 2010
Stutzman Refuse Disposal, a local company based in South Hutchinson, has been sold to California based Waste Connections. The deal will be complete November 1st. Stutzman currently serves about 50,000 Kansas customers and has 25 city contracts. The deal also includes Stutzman’s “single stream” recycling center in South Hutchinson. “I think that's the biggest key that we’re going to be able to do in the market for central Kansas is to continue to bolster that, creating jobs and creating materials to be processed here at home,” says Don Rogers who is making the move from Stutzman to Waste Connections.
NEWS
By Melody Pettit and KWCH 12 Eyewitness News | July 22, 2010
No running water or air conditioning and piles of trash. Those are the conditions found at a woman's home in the Rice County town of Little River. Authorities there say she fell through the cracks. Now, they're trying to do something about it. The sight is unbelievable. Trash from floor to ceiling in every room. "Be careful. She said there were two snakes that live under the piano," said Kelly Silas with the McPherson Care Center, as she moved through the home.
NEWS
May 26, 2010
by Kim Hynes (WICHITA, Kan.) Three million dollars short, that's the budget deficit the City of Wichita faces for this year. Part of the shortfall is because the city counted on new revenue from trash franchising, a system that's supposed to save you money. "That process has turned out to take a lot longer than we anticipated," said city manager Bob Layton. Layton says the hiring freeze at city hall made it difficult to create a system where everyone pays the same price and everyone on your block uses the same hauler.
NEWS
April 28, 2010
by Kim Hynes (SEDGWICK COUNTY, Kan.) Sedgwick County residents are throwing away less trash. There's been an 11% reduction in what's thrown away over the last three years. The county doesn't attribute all of that to recycling, although that's up 6%. Instead the county believes people are buying less so there's less to throw away. The number one thing businesses throw away is card board. For the general public, it's yard waste. The county recommends people mulch mow which can save time and money.
NEWS
By Eyewitness News | February 22, 2010
(EL DORADO, Kan.) A group of local college students went looking through the trash Monday afternoon to see what shouldn't have been there. Some Butler Community College students went dumpster diving trying to find anything they could recycle.  A campus official believed students in the dormitories were likely throwing away far more trash than necessary. The students, part of a campus "Green Team," hoped to raise recycling awareness and were surprised by just how much they could save.
NEWS
November 24, 2009
Megan Strader hosted a Live Interactive Blog on working at the recycling center - view a replay of the event at the bottom of this page. (WICHITA, Kan.) It's up to a group of men at the Harvey County Recycling Center to separate your paper from your glass, your trash from your tin. "You gotta keep it sorted, all the plastics and the bottles and the cans. You gotta be pretty fast," explains Clarence Hirrod.  But for one day, the guys got an extra hand.
NEWS
November 10, 2009
by Kim Hynes (WICHITA, Kan.) Lower trash bills and mandatory recycling, that's what Wichita's city manager is hoping to accomplish by changing the existing trash system.  And for the first time, locally owned hauler's say they'd support a change. Lies Trash stops at 30,000 homes across Wichita each week. But instead of driving all over town, Lies could soon focus on 30,000 homes in one area. "This maybe the best option for us. Take this while the city is offering it," said owner David Lies.
NEWS
October 25, 2008
by Kara Sewell (WICHITA, Kan.) Out with the old and into the trash. A drive-thru in Wichita Saturday took whatever its customers served up. "Anything basically that you can plug in, is what we take," says Brian Riley. Computers, TVs, keyboards; a signature is all you needed to give to get rid of your e-waste. "People need to realize that we're throwing this stuff away and its going somewhere," says Mary Schmitt. That somewhere could end up being a hazard. "Theres a lot of contamination with the computers whether its lead, different metals sinking into the ground," says Riley.
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